Don’t Be DisMAYED

If you’ve been in sales for any amount of time, you’ve probably heard the adage, “In order to get a ‘yes,’ you have to get a lot of “noes.”

And it’s true: whether you’re just starting out or well-established and pivoting focus, there’s value in hearing “no” over and over again. By allowing yourself to have the conversations and ask for the sale in the first place, you’re building out the confidence and testing out the different strategies that will eventually get you to a “yes.”

But how do you prevent yourself from becoming dismayed when you’re repeatedly hearing “no”? I’m talking that feeling of dread that plagues us whenever we have to pick up the phone to make a sales call. 

But how do you prevent yourself from becoming dismayed when you’re repeatedly hearing “no”? I’m talking that feeling of dread that plagues us whenever we have to pick up the phone to make a sales call. 

Key Takeaways

1. Remember the past experiences prospects bring to a conversation.  Just like you may have been burned by several recent rejections, your prospects are bringing the sum of their past experiences to the sales conversation as well, including any negative experiences they may have had. First, remember that this has nothing to do with you. Second, take some time before the call to consider what baggage a potential client might be bringing to the conversation so you’ll be better prepared to address any concerns.

2. Listen to what’s being said (and what’s not being said). Active listening is one of the best ways to demonstrate how an experience with us will be different from any negative experiences a prospect has had in the past. Taking notes during the conversation can empower you to be a better listener, noting key information for later so you can focus fully on understanding and sympathizing with what’s being said.

3. Ask for permission to go deeper. When a potential client starts opening up about their insecurities or anxieties, take it as an opportunity to dig a little deeper so you can truly understand where any hesitancies might be coming from. “Thank you for sharing that with me. Do I have permission to ask if you could explain more about why you feel that way?” Remember, this is NOT an opportunity to prove that working with you will be different. Instead, it should come fully from a place of service.

4. Be solution driven. When you’re asking for permission to dig deeper, you should also be looking for solutions. Think about how you can proactively address some of the concerns or emotions the client might have around working with you. Remember: one solution might be recognizing that you’re not the right fit (for now, at least) and referring the prospect to another contact who can better meet their needs.

Additional Resources

Need some help feeling more confident approaching your sales conversations? We’ve got you. Attend one of our upcoming Convert Labs, where we’ll discuss everything from pricing and offers to strategy and systems.

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